Category Archives: Cross-Generational Conversation: YAFS & OFFs

“Ain’t had a prayer since I don’t know when . . . .”

“Ain’t had a prayer since I don’t know when . . . .”

Imagine this scene (part of it really happened):

It’s August 6, and George W. Bush is at home in Houston, or maybe at the ranch. He’s finishing a watercolor, or (stay with me) reading a book, though certainly not that heavy new biography, “Bush,” by military/presidential historian Jean Edward Smith, which takes another big whack at his tattered reputation.

Maybe he’s even pondering the big presidential decision by Harry Truman made 71 years ago, because for many of the rest of us, August 6 is Hiroshima Day.

Whatever. Meanwhile across town, in a big Houston pavilion, more than 20,000 people are jammed and jamming, screaming their lungs out for — the Dixie Chicks, in a raucous, triumphant concert that sold out in minutes months ago. It’s the Chicks’ first appearance in Houston in fifteen years.

DCX-Dallas-cover
This month, the Chicks broke the record at their gig in Dallas, where they started out 20 years ago. (Last time they played Dallas, though, more than ten years back, they needed bodyguards. Srsly.)

Okay — I really have no idea what GWB was doing that day. But the part about the Chicks is the truth.

Continue reading “Ain’t had a prayer since I don’t know when . . . .”

New: A Religious Autobiography From “Interesting Times”

New: A Religious Autobiography From “Interesting Times”

“May you live in interesting times.” 

That’s a curse, remember? And 2016 marks fifty years for me among  Friends–a half century of almost nonstop “interesting times.” 

I’ve begun putting my experience of this era on paper, in a “religious autobiography, called Meetings. It’s now available.

If I believed in reincarnation, I’d be burning incense & spinning prayer wheels asking that on the next go-round, could the higher powers arrange for the times to be  possibly a bit less interesting? Say with fewer wars, more time to catch my breath, smell the roses, take the long walks on the beach–

Cover-FRONT-Meetings-SM-Rockwell

Who am I kidding?

Continue reading New: A Religious Autobiography From “Interesting Times”

Northwest YM Leaders Kick The LGBT Expulsion Can Down the Road

Northwest YM Leaders Kick The LGBT Expulsion Can Down the Road

Northwest Leaders Kick the LGBT Expulsion Can Down The Road

BREAKING: Two sources in Northwest Yearly Meeting confirmed late Friday Jan. 21, 2016 that the YM Administrative Council {AC} is deadlocked on the appeals calling for reinstatement of West Hills Friends [WHF}, expelled last summer for being an LGBT inclusive church.

Continue reading Northwest YM Leaders Kick The LGBT Expulsion Can Down the Road

“Shattering” Quakerism In the Northwest – Continued

“Shattering” Quakerism In the Northwest – Continued

Interview with Steve Angell  – PART TWO
[Part One of this conversation is here.]

Stephen Angell, Associate Editor of Quaker Theology, and  Professor of Quaker Studies at Earlham School of Religion, continues a conversation on his extensive report about the ongoing controversies over LGBT issues at George Fox University and in Northwest Yearly Meeting. [Hereafter GFU & NWYM] This struggle has resulted in the abrupt expulsion of one Meeting, loud protests from several others, and by many individual Friends there.  In Part One, Steve discussed issues at George Fox University. [CEF are the initials of Editor/blogger Chuck Fager.]

CEF: Now let’s turn to Northwest Yearly Meeting and the events that led to the expulsion of an LGBT welcoming meeting there.

Steve-Angell-and-Theol-Book
Steve Angell with his newest book.

Continue reading “Shattering” Quakerism In the Northwest – Continued

Tom Fox And The Last Supper

Tom Fox And The Last Supper

Tom Fox’s path from suburban northern Virginia to Iraq and a lonely martyr’s death was straightforward. We talked about that path  in August, 2005 when I saw him for the final time. 

I met Tom in the early 1990s at Langley Hill Friends meeting in McLean, Virginia, near Washington DC. We were both members. I didn’t know him especially well, but his children were the same ages as my younger two, and the four of them grew up in that meeting, conspiring to torment a generation of First Day School teachers, on many a weekend morning. 

CVR-Front-B-SM

Continue reading Tom Fox And The Last Supper

Appeal! Groundswell in Northwest Over A Welcoming Meeting’s Ouster

Appeal! Groundswell in Northwest Over A Welcoming Meeting’s Ouster

We reported on July 25 about the abrupt expulsion of West Hills Friends Meeting in Portland, Oregon by Northwest Yearly Meeting.

West Hills has been welcoming to LGBTQ folks for several years. Northwest YM (NWYM), an evangelical body, does not approve, though dissent about the official stance has been growing year by year.

Northwest’s Faith & Practice permits appeals of the expulsion, not only by West Hills itself, but by other local meetings. The period for filing appeals expires tonight at midnight, August 23, 2015. The appeals will be considered by NWYM’s Administrative Council, which has the final say.

WHF-Expelled-Appeal

The council will have a full packet when it takes up its task. The news of West Hills’ sudden expulsion (officially called a “release”) sent shock waves across the NWYM constituency, and evoked a swift, and increasingly massive, response, especially among younger adult Friends.

Continue reading Appeal! Groundswell in Northwest Over A Welcoming Meeting’s Ouster

Two Unforgettable Profiles In Courage: 1969

Two Unforgettable Profiles In Courage: 1969

The first “favorable” articles I ever read about homosexuality and bisexuality  were in WIN Magazine, a radical pacifist journal, in its “gay liberation issue” of November 15, 1969. (“Gay liberation” was a brand-new coinage then.)

I still remember how the “coming out” (yet another new phrase for me) story of and by David McReynolds, who was then the main staff member of the War Resisters League {WRL}, hit me like a series of physical blows.

McReynolds-Notes-Title-image

Continue reading Two Unforgettable Profiles In Courage: 1969

Guilford College President Responds To “Endangered” Blog Post

Guilford College President Responds To “Endangered” Blog Post

Chuck,

As a regular visitor to Guilford College, undoubtedly you have
witnessed the impact a liberal arts education rooted in Quaker values has on students. I think you would agree the world needs Guilford graduates more today than ever. That’s why we’re working overtime to make sure this important college not only survives but thrives for future generations.

Fernandes-Guilford
Guilford president Jane Fernandes, center.

We grieve for our friends at Sweet Briar as they close their college. At Guilford, we are proactive. Recently, we took concrete steps to align our expenses with current and anticipated revenues. But that is only the first phase of a community-wide, multi-year effort that will include revenue-generating initiatives under new and inspired enrollment and marketing leadership. We have a powerful story to tell about student outcomes, and we will make a strong appeal to students and families who will benefit from a Guilford education and want to invest in it.

Here’s how you and others can help: Spread the word to high school students and their families about the life-transforming, Quaker-based liberal arts education available at Guilford College. Let them know we are working to make Guilford as affordable as possible, and that the value of the investment a family makes in this College results not only in graduates who are critical thinkers but in ones who are prepared for immediate employment or graduate school. By the way, our job placement rate for graduates is 85% according to our latest survey against a national average of 58%.

And for those who have both vision and means, support Guilford philanthropically. This, too, is a wise investment. If you believe in the value of Quaker education, support Guilford and schools like it. This is a way to ensure that this unique, valuable educational experience is available to students and their families for many years to come.

Chuck, you have dedicated your life to action for social justice. Help us inspire Quakers and others who care about Quaker education to preserve the best educational opportunity out there today!  Way will open.

Jane K. Fernandes
President

 

A Blogger’s Footnote: Much as I admire Guilford as a Quaker outpost, I’m not in a position to sign up as a college booster or promoter. I encourage ideas and discussion here (and elsewhere): Friends, what can make sure Guilford will “survive & thrive”?

Guilford: Quaker College On The Endangered List?

Guilford: Quaker College On The Endangered List?

At Guilford College in Greensboro NC, the hullabaloo over graduation has died down. And now, a grim summer has begun.

Specifically, the passing out of diplomas was followed by the passing out of pink slips, to 52 staff and faculty. That’s thirteen percent of Guilford’s 400 employees, almost one in seven.

Sweetbriar-RIP-2 Continue reading Guilford: Quaker College On The Endangered List?

Made In Vietnam: My World. (Yours Too?)

Made in Vietnam: My World. (Yours Too?)

Just got a new blood pressure monitor. But this post is not about my blood pressure.

The old monitor gave out after several years: nothing but error messages. Amazon was ready with a new one, delivered the next day. Dropped from a drone?Drones-vs-storks I was running errands when it landed, so can’t be sure.
The new one’s highly rated, and from the same company as the old one.
Out of the box yesterday morning. First step, put in the batteries.
Flipped it over, popped the cover open. Then I noticed this label, just below it:
Monitor-label-all
Nothing remarkable. Except for this statement In tiny letters in the lower right corner:
Made-in-VN-closeup
That set me off. Not a flashback, exactly, but off on a (not uncommon) ADHD tangent:
I was born during a big war, World War Two. I have no real-time memories of it, but my childhood through the 1950s, in a military family, was saturated with its imagery: pictures, comics, books, movies, and then TV shows.
My father had flown bombers over Europe, barely escaped death many times, won medals, but didn’t talk about it. Still, the war, my “birth war,” was always there: fascinating, glorified, ubiquitous, and somber in ways I was too young to begin to grasp.
But it sank in. I expected, in high school, to follow my father into the Air Force.
1-CEF-ROTC-1962
A glimpse down the road not taken: me in 1961, the year I won the “Outstanding AFROTC Cadet” medal.
Then, the Sixties brought Vietnam. And life, in the form of the civil rights movement and exposure to active nonviolence, took me away from the military, to the anti-war side, and among Quakers.
But that’s another story.
I didn’t start hating  the military. But I soon began to learn, even from a “safe” distance, about the human costs of war.
The Vietnam lessons went on for about ten years, and yes, they were traumatic for me personally, even 8000 miles from Saigon/Ho Chi Minh City.
I’m not comparing myself to the millions of Vietnam veterans who never recovered from their firsthand war. But it undeniably had vast impact inside the U.S. Too, impact which continues, though I can’t even begin to fathom or chart the ways here.
Vietnam-wall
The impact was general. It was also, I see clearly now, very personal.
One personal impact was on my spiritual life: I learned that the biblical adage about how we reap what we sow wasn’t just an old saying: it was a Truth.
That learning didn’t make me a “Bible believer.” It did make me a “Take-a-Second-Look-Maybe-There’s-Something-Useful-Here-After-All” Bible reader.
In that second look I uncovered another truth, in Psalm 146: “Put not your trust in princes” (or, in a modern rendering, presidents who promise not to get into a big Vietnam War during a campaign, only to do exactly that three months after winning the election.)
This piece of Truth I’ve had to re-learn several times since; and now that it’s already 2016 everywhere but the calendar, here comes another marathon refresher course.
Yippee.
If World War Two was my father’s war and the frame of my childhood, Vietnam was my coming of age war. And besides being haunted by the living testimonies of veterans and others at home, there are several numbers from it that also continue to haunt:
1-million plus, the estimated total Vietnamese, mostly civilians, killed in it. Two, or thee million more in a sideshow war launched on Cambodia, which loosed a genocide as “collateral damage.”  And the unnumbered children and grandchildren of Vietnam disfigured by ongoing pieces of our war such as Agent Orange.
 (There are many photos of some of them on the net, casualties of our war who were not even born til a generation after it supposedly “ended”; but don’t look at them if you are weak of heart or stomach.)
SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA
Enlarge these images at your own risk. And know that there are American children and adults living with similar effects, who never went near Vietnam.
Thinking of that war, I often ponder some of what happened next: we were repeatedly told by our “Princes” of the day that we had to win it, because otherwise “Godless Communists” would take over, and impose an economic/political system that wouldn’t, couldn’t work.
The Hawks and wise Persons were right about that much: we lost the war, and after defeating the U.S., the Communists did impose their system; and behold, that system, especially the economic part, didn’t work.
So after running the Vietnamese economy into the ground, the rulers changed course and became, like the Chinese, a variety of authoritarian/corrupt crony capitalists. (Turns out they weren’t so “godless” after all; they shared the worship of Mammon with many of us.)
Now their economy works much “better.” Even the U.S. Government agrees, and we are now “friends” with Vietnam; many of our corporations are doing big business there. Like Amazon, for instance.  Starbucks and KFC too. And yes, McDonalds. (Turns out the franchise is –surprise, surprise — owned by the son of a high government official; he also has degrees from elite U.S. universities. “Would you like fries and an Ivy-League PhD with that, sir?”)
Mickey-Dees-VN
Had to be Ronald. And how do you say “Super-Size me” in Vietnamese? But seriously — it beats 5 million dead in war, yes?
But all this does not get to the bottom of my pondering. I keep asking, mostly silently but sometimes aloud: couldn’t we have figured out a way to just back off and leave Vietnam alone? Let the Communists, if they won their internal war, try out their dingbat system, let it fail, and then skip ahead to the post-Communist part?
The part where they make inexpensive blood pressure monitors?
If we had, several million deaths there could have been spared. Many hundreds of thousands of American lives would have been spared too. Not to mention all the hundreds of billions of debt that financed this bloody foolishness, left for us and our grandchildren to pay, in declining schools, failing bridges, roads, etc., etc.
But of course, we didn’t back off. And since my coming of age war, there have been numerous other U.S. wars, the ones of my middle age and senescence, which are ongoing. It’s likely some will still be underway when I meet my maker, even tho I’m hoping to live a good many more years.
So for almost half a century, promoting & working for “peace” has been an active goal for me. But as an American in my time, it is war, big and “small,” overt and secret, that has enveloped and shaped my life.
I didn’t want it that way. They say the Vietnam War ended 40 years ago this week. But I haven’t been able to escape it, or its spawn. Ignore it briefly, now and then; escape it, no.
All this tumbled through my mind as I slid the batteries into my new monitor, and got ready for its initial reading.
“Made in Vietnam.”
Maybe this post is about my blood pressure after all.
blood-pressure-reading-sketch