Category Archives: Divergent Friends

William Bartram: Up To His A** In Alligators

William Bartram, A Quaker Lenten Journey: Up To His Ass In AlligatorsTravels-book-open

William Bartram, traveling by canoe alone, somewhere in Florida, circa 1773. What I’m reflecting on: this was what he most wanted to do, what he felt was his leading. (I have divided some of his long sentences & longer paragraphs, for modern readers. The spelling is original.)

     THE evening was temperately cool and calm. The crocodiles began to roar and appear in uncommon numbers along the shores and in the river. I fixed my camp in an open plain, near the utmost projection of the promontory, under the shelter of a large Live Oak, which stood on the highest part of the ground and but a few yards from my boat.  Continue reading William Bartram: Up To His A** In Alligators

Traveling With A Divergent Friend For Lent: William Bartram

William Bartram: Divergent Friend

I’ve taken a fancy to do some traveling for Lent this year. I plan to join William Bartram, an independent-minded Quaker naturalist and artist, in a  journey through much of the southeast U.S.

WilliamBartramThis is not the Southeast of today, but that of 1773, so technically there wasn’t a U.S. yet; whatever. Bartram spent four years wandering the Southeast, drawing plants and animals, maps, and doing sketch portraits of Indians he visited with, and he visited with many.

I call him a “Divergent Friend” because he went his own way, following his own leading.  He was not a “rebel” or a troublemaker; yet he was hardly typical or “normal” either.

Continue reading Traveling With A Divergent Friend For Lent: William Bartram

The Appeal of Quakerism to The Non-Mystic

The Appeal of Quakerism to the Non-Mystic

Can you be a Quaker in  the 21st century (especially a Liberal one), and not be a mystic?

Yes. And that’s been true for a LONG time. A century ago, in 1916, a noted British Friend made this case (but he was not the first or the last) in a striking pamphlet that unfortunately is little-known today.

To help relieve this work’s obscurity, we present it here; just click on the title below.

Take it away, William!

Littleboy-Appeal-of-Quakerism-to-the-Non-Mystic

Alone Together: Living With & Writing About Progressive Friends

Grave_Buffum_ChaceResearching and writing about Progressive Friends took up most of my time from the autumn of 2013 through the spring of 2014. Often this was a paradoxical experience: from one angle, it was a very solitary effort: from another, very crowded.

I did this research at Pendle Hill in Pennsylvania, as the Cadbury research scholar in Quaker History. Most of my time at Pendle Hill was spent solo: in the Friends Historical Library at nearby Swarthmore College, poring over old letters, minutes, pamphlets and books; in my room, reading more old documents; then lots of staring into my computer screen, at the ever-growing store of texts available there.

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Getting Progressive With Sojourner Truth & Friends

The Progressive Friends were a group that hasn’t yet got their props from Quaker historians. There isn’t space here for an outline of their fascinating history, except to say you can find out more here and here.

Pennsylvaia Progressive Friends Minute Book

But in sum, they started as liberal rebels in mid-1800s America, who took on a hidebound Hicksite Establishment. And they ended, invisibly but unmistakably, as the seedbed and founders of modern US liberal Quakerism. The fact that almost nobody knows this is a shame, but no surprise given the general ignorance of Quaker history among Quakers. (I’ll rant about that some other time.)

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“Spirit Rising”: A Review In Installments — Part 1

Spirit Rising book

“Spirit Rising”: A Review in Installments — Part 1

356 pages, $17. 50. Published by Quaker Press.

Part One

“If we have done our job,” write the ten Young Adult Friends (YAFs) who edited this new book of writings by their Quaker peers, “. . . some pieces may surprise, confuse, alarm or even offend you.”

Continue reading “Spirit Rising”: A Review In Installments — Part 1

Enough With the Anti-Institutional Sloganeering: A Divergent Friend Speaks

I’m increasingly troubled by the repetition of anti-institutional slogans in what is sometimes called “emergent” Quaker circles and conversations. Much of this, in my reading, consists of about one per cent of insight, that’s being puffed up like a bit of rubber into a big-looking balloon of empty hot air.

Continue reading Enough With the Anti-Institutional Sloganeering: A Divergent Friend Speaks

Fleecing The Faithful – Prelude: Down the Garden Path & Opening Pandora’s Box

The 1989 Friends Ministers Conference was the fourth in a series that were held every five years. The event had started out as the Friends Pastors Conference, but this was changed for the 1984 gathering in a bow to traditional Quaker nomenclature, and to accommodate the sensibilities of the handful of attenders who came from the non-pastoral Quaker groups. (I was one.)The 1989 gathering was scheduled for Denver. The planning committee’s chairman was Eugene Coffin. Priscilla Deters’ introduction to the committee was succinctly described by an Investigator for the Kansas State Security Commission, Gary Fulton. Writing in 1994, he explained that:

Continue reading Fleecing The Faithful – Prelude: Down the Garden Path & Opening Pandora’s Box