Phil Harmon’s Victims Speak

I

Courtroom theatrics is not what the Harmon case is about. Its “bottom line” is the theft from 230 people, mostly elderly, of their life savings, and of health coverage from several hundred more. That’s what it’s all about.Nevertheless, when Harmon comes back to court on May 4 of this year, there ought to be some drama in the courtroom.

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Deters: A Real-Life Nightmare, and a Possible Vision

There were a lot of nights like this by 1996.It’s Friday in Lincoln, Nebraska. June 26. There’s been an evening service at the First Church of the Nazarene, which is over now. A dozen people have remained behind, at first clustered in the sanctuary, then moving to a classroom. There they settle into chairs around a well-dressed middle aged woman, who talks to them earnestly for two hours.

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“Roomful of Elephants” – A Response by Patrick Nugent

A response by Patrick Nugent, who is soon to complete his work as Principal of Friends Theological College.

06/09/2007

Introduction: I’ve long admired Patrick Nugent for the high quality of his theological scholarship and reflection (see this essay for a fine example: http://www.quaker.org/quest/issue7-2-nugent01.htm . I also bow to his commitment to putting that theology into practice, as in his service in Kenya.

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Fleecing The Faithful: An Exclusive In-Depth Investigative Report

How Religious Con Artists Stole $35 Million Dollars from Quakers, Nazarenes and Other Churches, And How They’ll Steal From YOU If You Let Them

An In-Depth Investigative Report by
Chuck Fager

INTRODUCTION–February, 1998

This report is about crime and churches. It is also about Mary Washburn.

Mary Washburn was a widow when she moved from Tyler, Texas back home to Cherokee, Oklahoma. She had been gone for thirty-three years, and she returned to the old home place mainly to be safe. “There were a lot of illegal aliens and colored down in Tyler,” she said candidly, “and seemed like there was a murder every weekend.”

Cherokee should have been safe enough; Oklahoma City was nearly a hundred miles away, and Tulsa, another fifty.

But it wasn’t. A criminal followed Mary Washburn to Cherokee, stalked her to her house, and stole all the money she had, $68,000. “There’s no way in the world I can get it back,” she told me.
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