Category Archives: Annals of Inequality

Txsgiving Turkey was a BIG Honking TURKEY for NC Furniture Workers

Winston-Salem NC-United Furniture Industries Inc. has stopped production abruptly at its five Triad facilities — where it was reported to have had between 530 and 600 employees — as part of what appears to be an overall shutdown of the business.

Multiple media reports say employees in Winston-Salem, Verona, Miss., and Victorville, Calif., as well as delivery drivers, received emails from United’s board of directors late Monday and early Tuesday.

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The War On Thanksgiving??

As America heads into the third Thanksgiving since the pandemic, a lot of things look like they’re back to normal:

Families are gathering around the table together and travel is forecast to be at its highest level in decades. Even the anticipated turkey shortage didn’t materialize, according to the USDA. After three long years of socially distanced holidays, we’re back to merely worrying about who might  . . . ruin the feast by shouting at each other about politics. . .

Look closely, though, and there’s one thing that’s strikingly different from how Thanksgiving worked in the long-lost world of November 2019 — and it’s something to be grateful for: A lot of stores will actually close.

Back in the before times, one of the long-festering trends of the fourth weekend of November was the steady encroachment of that bigger holiday scheduled for December. Not long ago, Black Friday didn’t even have a name; by 2019, the signature kickoff event of the Christmas shopping season had bled into Thanksgiving itself.

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Water is Life. When Their Wells Dry Up, Bottled Water Is Life. Then . . .?

As California’s wells dry up, residents rely on bottled water to survive


[Excerpts]

In drought-parched Central Valley, thousands rely on trucked and bottled water as they wait for new wells

Washington Post — By Joshua Partlow
 — November 14, 2022

Continue reading Water is Life. When Their Wells Dry Up, Bottled Water Is Life. Then . . .?

Quote of the Week: What (& Who) Makes a Chair a “Chair”?

Tom Edsall writes data- and research-driven columns in the New York Times that frequently make my head spin and my heart sink. Today he did both by talking about a chair . . . .

Edsall: David Autor is an economist at M.I.T. who has written on the role of the trade shocks that have driven white working class voters into the arms of the Republican Party . . . .

In a July 2022 paper “The Labor Market Impacts of Technological Change: From Unbridled Enthusiasm to Qualified Optimism to Vast Uncertainty,” Autor describes how artificial intelligence radically enlarges the potential of robotics and automation to replace workers not only performing routine tasks but more complex procedures:

“What makes a task routine is that it follows an explicit, fully specified set of rules and procedures. Tasks fitting this description can in many cases be codified in computer software and executed by machines.”

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The U. S. Higher Ed Crisis: How it Happened, How to Fix It

CNBC- PERSONAL FINANCE

How college became so expensive, and how we can turn it around, according to a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

KEY POINTS
  • How college became so expensive, and its consequences on families and U.S. society, are the issues explored in Will Bunch’s new book, After the Ivory Tower Falls.
  • “The impact of this decision to privatize higher education, which was done with shockingly little public debate, has been enormous,” Bunch said.
The average cost to attend a private college in 1970 was about $3,000 a year. Today, it costs more than $50,000.
How we got to this point, and its seemingly endless consequences on families and U.S. society, are the issues explored in Will Bunch’s new book, “After the Ivory Tower Falls: How College Broke the American Dream and Blew Up Our Politics―and How to Fix It.”

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