Category Archives: Remarkable Friends

Quaker Book Review: “The Living Remnant” Rides Again

 

The Living Remnant & Other Quaker Tales. By “KKK,” (Edith Florence O’Brien.) Published by Headley Brothers in UK, 1900.

A Friend came across this book and passed along a link. It’s a series of four related stories about a tightly-knit (i. e., very insular) British Quaker meeting community, in about 1875. The “tales” portray, in sequence: an old-fashioned courtship; the subsequent wedding; the final dissolution of a stubbornly backward-looking Quaker faction, fixated on a version of the faith that time has quietly but remorselessly passed by; and then closes with the prospect of possible renewal as well as change.

Continue reading Quaker Book Review: “The Living Remnant” Rides Again

William Penn Is Making a comeback — And Quakers Aren’t Going to Like It

[Note: the headline above needs some clarification: actually it’s liberal Quakers who aren’t likely to welcome Penn’s comeback; many others may cheer. More on that below.]

May I have your attention, liberal Quakers? The effort among some of you to expunge William Penn from our Friendly pantheon because he owned slaves has in many  ways been a big success: his name has been scrubbed from the rooms, building & events you frequent; his writings downplayed or ignored, and the search for replacement paragons, and even a replacement history, is underway.

But if one were to look beyond the increasingly narrowed liberal horizon, one might catch sight of a novel phenomenon: beyond it, especially in (of all places) the former Quaker stronghold of Pennsylvania: William Penn is being exhumed, dusted off, and readied for a comeback. Continue reading William Penn Is Making a comeback — And Quakers Aren’t Going to Like It

Heads Up: Willian Penn Followup Coming Soon

Was William Penn Punished Enough? (Partial List)

Jailed:

  •  Cork Ireland, Sept. 1668, for attending meeting.
  •  Tower of London, Nov or Dec-1668 – 8 months; accused (but not tried) of blasphemy, wrote No Cross, No Crown.
  •  Again in August 1670, for preaching, tried with Quaker William Mead in Mead-Bushell case: established the right of juries to reach their own verdict free of judicial pressure.

Continue reading Heads Up: Willian Penn Followup Coming Soon

Staughton Lynd, Remarkable Independent Quaker Radical, Historian and Quaker Activist Turned Labor Lawyer, Dies at 92

The activist and historian Staughton Lynd in 2019. “At age 16 and 17, I wanted to find a way to change the world,” he said in 2010. “Just as I do at age 79.”Credit…Dustin Franz for The New York Times

After being blacklisted from academia for his antiwar activity, he became an organizer among steel workers in the industrial Midwest.

New York Times — November 20, 2022

Staughton Lynd, a historian and lawyer who over a long and varied career organized schools for Black children in Mississippi, led antiwar protests in Washington and fought for labor rights in the industrial Midwest, died on Thursday in the town of Warren, in northeast Ohio. He was 92.

Continue reading Staughton Lynd, Remarkable Independent Quaker Radical, Historian and Quaker Activist Turned Labor Lawyer, Dies at 92

Noted Quaker Atheist Dies in New York; Also Kept Diary, & Was A Composer

Ned Rorem, Pulitzer-winning composer and noted diarist, dies at 99

Washington Post — (AP)
By Tim Page
 — November 18, 2022

He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1976 for his orchestral suite ‘Air Music.’ His diaries offered a ‘worldly, intelligent, licentious, highly indiscreet’ entree into elite gay and artistic circles.


Composer and author Ned Rorem won the Pulitzer Prize in 1976 for “Air Music,” an orchestral suite.

Ned Rorem, a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and the author of more than a dozen published diaries that were remarkable for their candid entree into elite gay and artistic circles from the 1960s onward, died Nov. 18 at his home in Manhattan. He was 99. Continue reading Noted Quaker Atheist Dies in New York; Also Kept Diary, & Was A Composer