Rename the Pettus Bridge? I’m in no hurry.

[NOTE: See also this UPDATE to this post, here.}
I feel torn about renaming the Pettus bridge in Selma, Alabama. On the one hand, Pettus was all those odious things: traitor, KKK leader, etc., etc.

On the other hand, John Lewis & many others shed their blood under that sign, and seared its letters onto the conscience of the world. They made it  a sacred place of pilgrimage on the long road to justice.

History is like that: sometimes ironic, paradoxical— thank God.

So I say leave it be, as a sign that sometimes much unexpected good can come out of much unrequited evil.

Whenever I imagine how Pettus would react to the Bridge’s renown among those who rolled back the slavery & oppression he upheld, it brings a smile that’s rare in these haunted days. 

I know the decision will be made by others, mostly younger. But I still carry my memories of standing with Lewis and others when the “Bloody Sunday” March was announced, then crossing the Pettus bridge behind Lewis, more than once. (I was lucky; the clubs & gas were in abeyance for these treks; but the armed federal troops guarding us were very real.)

1965, Selma: John Lewis, left, in a tie: me, right rear.

It’s something to study & debate peaceably. There are many other places & memorials that could be named for John Lewis. Yet things change. I’ll accept the verdict. There are bigger fish to fry.

The grave of Edmund Pettus, Live Oak Cemetery, Selma. My photo.

 

One thought on “Rename the Pettus Bridge? I’m in no hurry.”

  1. I am an 80 year old native Alabamian! (I am descended from early Delaware Quakers.) Even though I see no reason to honor traitors, I am not black. What happened to African Americans can only be equaled to what whites did to Native Americans! Let the Selma community decide what happens to the name of the bridge.

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